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63 and looking for ESL job?

 
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Jaime



Joined: 15 Dec 2009
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 12:26 pm    Post subject: 63 and looking for ESL job? Reply with quote

Hi!

I am 63 years old. I have been teaching in México for the past 12 years, with some schools but mostly private students. I have taught in offices in various fields. I have been specializing in the new regs. for pilots to achieve level 4 in order to maintain their license to fly out of their native speaking country. I taught 6th grade in Vineland, N.J. back in the 60's as well.

I may be 63 but act more like 40 with the same enthusiasm. What I would like to know is, what are my chances at this age to really find a ESL job in another country?

I have duel nationality US and Méxican. I am 100% American Educated and only moved here in 1997.

Thank you for you help in resolving the issue of age!

Sincerely,

James D. Sammon
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chinablix



Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:39 pm    Post subject: Re: 63 and looking for ESL job? Reply with quote

Jaime wrote:
Hi!

I am 63 years old. I have been teaching in México for the past 12 years, with some schools but mostly private students. I have taught in offices in various fields. I have been specializing in the new regs. for pilots to achieve level 4 in order to maintain their license to fly out of their native speaking country. I taught 6th grade in Vineland, N.J. back in the 60's as well.

I may be 63 but act more like 40 with the same enthusiasm. What I would like to know is, what are my chances at this age to really find a ESL job in another country?

I have duel nationality US and Méxican. I am 100% American Educated and only moved here in 1997.

Thank you for you help in resolving the issue of age!

Sincerely,

James D. Sammon


I work here in China and there is some age discrimination. Some jobs specify as young as under 50 (that is the retirement age in China), some specify under 60 and some don't say a thing. Sex discrimiation is alive and well here, some ads specify sex, but it is a lot more rare then age.

I'm 59

I pretty much ignore the age limitations, it never hurts to apply.

I have met people here who are teaching in their 70's. I recently accepted a position at a new school and they specified on their want ad, under 60. I intend on staying there two years and when I go to sign the contract I will tell them that.

I am like you, but probably have the energy level of a 30 year old.

As always, when you get an offer of a job, do an internet search of the school. I've refused jobs that have more then a few negative posts from former teachers.

Good luck.

.
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ICAL_Pete



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 119

PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many teachers who start out in TEFL later in life come up against ageism in their 50s and 60s. A lot depends on the country. For example in France it is not uncommon to find schools where well over two thirds of the teaching staff is over 50s. In Indonesia instead you’d be pressed to find a school where there is one teacher over 30.

Male over 40s will find the Middle East welcomes mature teachers. Although 55 is often the limit for new TEFLers in some parts.

China is also a country that seems to have no major age restraints when it comes to hiring English teachers.

In Thailand the vast majority of the TEFL teachers are over 40. Many are 50+, and there are some sprightly 70-year-olds doing a great job.

In Korea age discrimination is quite prevalent so you should check out a few of the regional offices there if this country is of interest to you. The three main agencies are GEPIK, SMOE, and EPIK.

Croatia is starving for TEFL qualified native speakers and age is not an issue. It's worth a look if you are interested in teaching in Europe.

Missionary and volunteer work around the world offer opportunities to teachers of all ages and is often the choice of many older Americans who find it the perfect way to get started in a foreign country knowing that by offering their teaching skills they can always count on the Mission or Volunteer Organisations to help out and support them in their new environment.

There is more on this here.
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Shakespearean



Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Basically, ESL jobs have become present anywhere in the non-English speaking world. That sad part is, most people in really developed non-English speaking countries seek out help for ESL studies in developing nations who have really excellent ESL talents.

So, if ever you really want to try out your luck teaching ESL, then you might need to really dissect the world wide web by prioritizing your search on the developing countries who have really great ESL talents.

Jane Phillis

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Azhar



Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello,
i suggest you if yoy want a job in another country than you have to apply in Germany for ESL job because Teaching English as a second language is a job that is usually associated with either working in the developing world or teaching immigrants to English speaking countries. In fact, many ESL teachers use their ESL teaching skills as a means to visit far flung corners of the globe. Seeking ESL jobs in regions of the developing world in particular can be very different from seeking ESL jobs in an English speaking or European country. The requirements are often a bit more relaxed; for instance, you may be able to teach ESL without any experience or without a teaching certificate. The students often have minimal experience with English, if any at all.

Teaching ESL in Germany is a different prospect. German schools start children in English language education at a young age, and the citizens are exposed to a great deal of English culturally. For this reason, many ESL teaching jobs in Germany are for teachers who are qualified to teach English at the advanced level.

Since English language education does start at a young age in Germany, there are openings for ESL teachers at the elementary level. However, it is far more common for ESL jobs to be found at the secondary or university level. Another popular avenue for ESL jobs in Germany is though businesses that have a large international presence; many of these companies keep ESL teachers on staff to ensure their employees are fluent in English.
What You Need to Know about Working in Germany
If you want to teach ESL in Germany, you will need a work visa. Fortunately, since English teachers are so valued, there is seldom a problem in securing a permit. You must find an employer before you apply for a visa, and the employer will arrange for your visa on your behalf. Be aware that a visa generally ties you to a specific position. Furthermore, a visa for employment in Germany does not translate into European Union wide employability. Immigration procedures for the handling of non-EU citizens are managed on a national basis.

Once in Germany, you will have three months to establish yourself on the national health system and arrange for a tax idea number, and then you will receive final clearance for your permit. Luckily, you can work in the meantime.

Another important thing ESL teachers heading to Germany for work should be familiar with is the tax system. If you work on a freelance basis, you will be heavily taxed. The best case scenario in terms of managing the tax burden is to seek a job in a school that will list you as a full time employee; full time employees pay far less tax than freelancers. Note that being a full time employee is not the same thing as having a contract – you must be on the full time payroll to avoid excessive taxation.
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