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Teaching ESL to Kindergarten in China

 
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dewijon



Joined: 27 May 2004
Posts: 1
Location: Guangzhou, China

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 3:31 am    Post subject: Teaching ESL to Kindergarten in China Reply with quote

Hi,

I have been teaching in China for the last year and have just been informed that I shall be teaching Kindergarten from next Tuesday!

I have had no experience teaching such young children and need advice desperately. Does anyone know of a decent textbook and activity book. Any book or web site that can give me help in this hour of need!

Any experienced Kindergarten Teacher who could spare some time to help.

Many thanks

Dewi
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unionjack
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Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 494
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2004 12:15 am    Post subject: kindergarten Reply with quote

I know of a teacher in a similar situation to yourself in China and he used a puppet on his hand. He couldn't handle them without that. He spoke through the puppet and it was as though he didn't exist, as far as the children were concerned. The puppet he used was so heavy, that his arm ached at the end of the day, so make sure yours is a light weight one. One day, it was so hot that his arm swelled up and he couldn't get the puppet off at the end of the day, and so he had to ride home on his bike, with this puppet stuck on his arm. It probably wasn't funny at the time.

Best of luck.
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jbubba



Joined: 28 Apr 2004
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2004 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Unionjack,

That's a great story! Haven't laughed that hard in a long time. You have to post more like those!

- Bubba
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joie



Joined: 16 Sep 2004
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2004 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for posting that idea..
well to me.. I tried to teach them many songs, action songs which is related to the lessons. And i used a lot of visual aids...
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unionjack
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Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 494
Location: UK

PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 11:42 am    Post subject: lesson plans Reply with quote

I 'nicked' this from another forum but I'm sure they won't mind.
I thought it was excellent for newbies and the experienced.


Teaching ESL to children in Japan is easy with the right tools! by Craig Desorcy

Kids have the attention span of an ant! Why wouldn’t they?
They have everything they could ever want given to them in a New York second.
Your biggest competition in keeping their attention is their GAMEBOY and GAMECUBE and that is some REAL competition.

Not to worry because I got this down big time and I’m going to give it to you. The Key points I will share with you are GOLD so don’t think because it’s simple you can skip taking mental notes. This act could be fatal to your success in working with kids.

Have you ever watched Sesame Street? I grew up watching that show.
I suggest you watch it again to refresh your mind. What you should be looking for is the flow of how they educate you. It’s very interesting.

There is a theme for each show and all the activities are wrapped around this theme.

Each show may be only thirty minutes. However, in this time they manage to get about 11 to 13 powerful activities into this short time frame!

I call this style “edutainment” - education / entertainment.

In Japan the children English classes that are in the top 20% are very entertaining and educational.

If you feel you can’t teach kids, don’t worry. On my first day teaching kids I came home after work and told my wife that I would never do that again! But I learned and you will, too. Remember, too, that I had no one to guide me back then but you’ve got me !

Let’s take a walk through one of my kid’s classes together.

My kiddy class has 6 kids from three to five years of age.

The class is forty minutes, once a week, four times a month.

Each child has a nametag. If your school doesn’t have them, you can make them.

Before the class starts I’m playing some kid’s music in the background (Ever been to Disneyland? The music you hear sets the tone as you approach that awesome place.).

The kids always come a little early, so before the class starts the music is playing and I toss a balloon around with them. On the floor or table are their nametags. Help them put them on and soon they can recognize their own name in English.

(You must, no matter what, remember all their names and use them through out the class at least five times per student.)

1. As soon as it’s time I put away the ball, put on my hello song and start singing and waving my hand high in the air. They will follow because I have built considerable rapport with them before the class started.

2. I sit on the floor and pull out a card with the letter I on it. I point to myself and say, “I am Michael” and pass the card. Each kid will do the same and if one child doesn’t, then I just move on to the next child. (I do this with YOU cards, YOUR cards, HE, SHE and so on.)

3. I pull out a bag and ask what’s in it? They have no idea. I put my hands in the air and say “I don’t know with a confused look on my face. They all repeat and they have just learned the expression, “I don’t know.” I pass the bag to all the students, they feel it and try to guess what’s inside. If a child keeps it too long I say 3, 2, 1 pass!

4. I tell them to go sit down please because we are now going to play bingo.
Each bingo I do has a total of six pictures with the English word for the picture under it.
For example I have vowel bingo that has only “A” words with pictures of things like a ball, apple, ant and so on.

5. After Bingo comes story time. I read a story book to them which has an easy sentence structure and the kids can repeat after the second time of reading this book to them
One book I use is called “I like.” I like to eat, I like to play ball, I like to read and so on. These books are a set from http://www.scholastic.com/elt/highfrequency.htm
They are over-sized books and these are exactly the type of books you want to be using to keep the students attention. These books are by far the best investment I have made in my teacher’s toolbox since I’ve been here!

5. Now I show them fish cards with many cool colors. We flip them trying to make a set.
(Always team the students up in pairs. If there are not enough students you will need to jump in and play.) Before you do this game you may want to drill the colors for a minute and ask them what the colors are. Now is a good time to teach them to raise their hand saying at the same time say “I know!” If they get it right give them the card but get it back quickly so you can play the real game.

(While doing activities make sure you are working the room. Letting your students know that they’re doing well, lots of give me fives and smiling! Encourage and support them and they will just love you and your class!!)

6. Color time! (Teaching them color time, story time and other TIMES teaches them that there is a time for everything.) With color time all the students have a sketchpad they bought from the dollar shop with crayons. I have them draw a big circle, triangle and square. Next I have a hand out and they say, “Give me one, please.” The handouts are letters with a matching photo they can color. But first they have to say, “Give me glue, please,” so that I can glue the handout into their sketch book. I do the gluing because I’m fast. The kids use too much glue and are slow and messy which is fine in art class but in a forty-minute class that only meets once a week speed is essential.

7. Next we have song time. Get them moving after sitting for some time.
You can use songs such as “Head-shoulders-knees and Toes”, “If you’re Happy and you Know it.”

8. Vowel Drill time. I have a vowel poster with words and pictures glued to a big piece of cardboard and I drill the vowels. I say the sound and word of a vowel and they repeat. Again speed is the key. I also use a funny voice and chant the vowel sound and word. Make up some silly chant and they will follow, loving it and you!

9. Counting. I count 1 to 10 but it goes like this. I say one, they say two and so on.
Do it really fast and they’ll like it.

10. I throw about 25 cards all over the room. Today we are doing the vowel “a” so the cards are all words and photos starting with the letter a. Each card has 4 to 5 of the same thing so everyone can get one. Then I call out “Ahhh” and then say the word apple! They have to find all the cards with an apple on it.
Once this is done they count the cards and tell me how many they have.

11. They sit down and we do a page from their textbook and workbook.

Next is the “Good-bye” song and a big “See you next week!”

I change the procedure every six classes but the color handouts and textbook materials change every class.

Most teachers will not put this kind of power and preparation into their classes and that’s why they’re part of the 80% that are just getting by.

Whatever… Here are the key ingredients to remember in order to be successful working with kids.

Every activity should have a goal/objective that contains an educational and entertaining element to it.

Time-wasting, meaningless activities are for the weak and lazy. If you do this you are just another fly by night foreigner who will be found out and tossed out.

Touch your kids. Shake their hands, give them high fives, tickle gently them and so on.
Kids don’t have word power yet and they depend heavily on their feelings to guide them and communicate with others.
Playing with them physically will build the rapport which is needed to guide them through your lessons.
(Some schools have rules against physical contact but it’s mostly for adult students.)

Respect your kids by thanking them in advance for doing activities. Always use “Please”, “Thank you”, “You’re the best”, “Good job” and so on.

Praise them every chance you get and build them up honestly.

If you notice some of your activities are bombing during a class drop them, go into your next one (always have one or two back up, sure-fire activities just in case) without missing a beat. Later, figure out why the activities were bombing but don’t discard them. Don’t ever blame the kids for your difficulties.

Join ETJ online discussion forum for teachers teaching in Japan. http://groups.yahoo.com/search?query=ETJ
Here you can ponder with others over the activities you are trying to fine tune and find other related help.

Each activity should be done in a different part of the room. Keep the kids moving!

Of course you should always take courses on teaching kids while you’re here and read as many books as you can on the subject.

You can find books on teaching Japanese children English at any online bookstore.
The following link has some helpful resources too.
http://www.teachinginjapan.com/

In Japan there are 100-yen shops. Back home they’re called dollar shops.
Here’s where you can get ideas and great material to create killer activities for the little ones. But don’t spend too much. You many want to put 2,000 yen away per month for this stuff (2,000 yen is about US$19).

Use a lot of TPR in your classes with kids and adults.
TRP stands for “Total physical Response Teaching.”
Check out the following links for info on TPR
Total Physical Response

Follow my instruction and you will be way ahead of anyone just coming here trying to figure things out alone.

To your ESL teaching success and beyond,

Craig Desorcy
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Age



Joined: 12 Aug 2005
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:30 am    Post subject: Getting a job Reply with quote

I hope this doesnt bother anyone, but I was wondering if anyone knew of any business that are hiring young male high school grads. A friend of mine just wne last year without any experience and received a job in China. I was wondering if anyone knew of any places that might be looking for someone who wants some culture in their lives?

Thanks, Age
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Nonpartin Harenyp



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did he ever get the puppet off his hand?

Quote:
I know of a teacher in a similar situation to yourself in China and he used a puppet on his hand. He couldn't handle them without that. He spoke through the puppet and it was as though he didn't exist, as far as the children were concerned. The puppet he used was so heavy, that his arm ached at the end of the day, so make sure yours is a light weight one. One day, it was so hot that his arm swelled up and he couldn't get the puppet off at the end of the day, and so he had to ride home on his bike, with this puppet stuck on his arm. It probably wasn't funny at the time.


NPHN
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unionjack
Site Admin


Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 494
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 1:18 am    Post subject: Puppet Reply with quote

I believe he did but the puppet is a great idea and we need more of these ideas to help with the teaching of ESL to small children.

Anybody else have any ideas?

UJ
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lordan



Joined: 10 Nov 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Bai Shan

PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 9:58 am    Post subject: teaching kids with puppets Reply with quote

At 63, and in China, Russia, Korea some 15 years, I hesitently accepted a job teaching primary kids in Bai Shan, a small town here in eastern Jilin province as a way to experience a "normal" town after having lived in Shanghai, Beijing, Wuhan, Changchun and other medium towns. I have found puppets effective in getting kids to listen, to do the dialogues and to enjoy my teaching. This and using as much realia as possible, and knowing exactly what and when to do your stuff in class, and being not doing any one thing too long helps lower the unrulyness. On relia, I take real food, coffee etc for intance when the vocab is on food. Even poured water on the hands of kindergartners when teaching the word 'water".;When the dialogue called for setting the table, ironing, drying the dishes, (helping Mom) I took dishes, glasses, silverware, brooms, mops, flowers and other realia and the kids begged to take part. However, I found in using an computerized overhead computer effective but taking time to run it I lost the attentiion of the class. I have also found that using bilingual stories and songs make things go better. Anyone wanting to come to teach in this good school, and only three hours from some big cities, but within 10 minutes of ski hill, write me.
Dennis L. In Bai Shan <denniseslteacher@yahoo.com>
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Lee Hobbs
Site Admin


Joined: 08 Dec 2005
Posts: 141
Location: TheGulfCoast

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 3:49 am    Post subject: Re: Getting a job Reply with quote

Age wrote:
. . . I was wondering if anyone knew of any business that are hiring young male high school grads . . .

Age,

I'd say you're in the wrong forum-thread to find an answer to this question.

Have a look through some of the other ESL threads here:

http://www.esl-jobs-forum.com/viewforum.php?f=15

I think you'll have a better chance of getting your questions answered over there. This thread is just about ESL kindergarten classes.

By the way, IMHO, I think you'll be hard-pressed to find a country that will hire you legally (with papers, etc.) for ESL employment or otherwise with nothing more than a high school diploma. If you do manage to find some ESL work on those credentials alone, please let us know by taking the six-question survey at:

CLICK HERE FOR SURVEY

Good luck!

Lee

http://www.english-blog.com

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Lee's blog is still available, however, here: www.english-blog.com
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Pepe



Joined: 06 Mar 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Zhoushan, China

PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 2:14 am    Post subject: Kindergarten Ideas, and a question. Reply with quote

I've been a Kindergarten teacher for 6 months, living in China.

So far, I've found the most successful thing (with the least planning time) is songs. Just make sure that there is a purpose to the song (I.e. must be some new words or phrases) Identify these key words or phrases, and then you can cut out alot of the meaningless words in the song, but being careful to make the song flow, with the right number of syllables etc. Also, have pictures of the main characters or objects, and teach these first.

If you have a little preparation time, I would suggest simple plays. I've used the 3 little pigs successfully, making pig and wolf masks. Just simplify the language, and repeat until they can all say it. If you have a large class, then a good idea would be to halve it for a lesson like this, so all the children get to act.

One thing I have had trouble with, is outside classes. I've been told this is a great way to bond with the kids, and teach them at the same time, but most of my outside classes turn into a free-for-all, with me at the bottom of a pile of laughing children. I've played "whats the time Mr. Wolf" and "Duck duck goose", and pretty much worn those out. I can't think of, or find any other outside activities to play with the kids. Ones that involve english words would be better. Anyone have any ideas? (by the way, my classes range from ages 3-7, and run for 40 minutes)

Thanks
Peter.
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linguring



Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 8
Location: Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Sun Aug 22, 2010 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems like the advice has been pretty thoroughly covered by unionjack (thanks btw) but I do like the puppet idea!
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Elby_03



Joined: 27 Nov 2013
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2013 4:44 am    Post subject: ESL to Young Learners... Reply with quote

May be I am too late to reply, still I'd like to add my thoughts for readers. I am a teacher at Phoenix kindergarten with 6 years of experience. Whenever I need something new or different for my kids, I Google it out. I find huge stuff on the internet and try it out with my kids. They really enjoy it.
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rept12



Joined: 04 Sep 2017
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been a teacher in a kindergarten from last year in Calgary, Whenever I play with children's I really enjoyed and I teach him so many things.
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