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teaching in Korea without a 4-year degree

 
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edamron



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 2:45 am    Post subject: teaching in Korea without a 4-year degree Reply with quote

Hi--

My husband will be teaching in Korea for 3 years as a prof of political science starting this Fall. I will have a visa to come with but I am not quite sure if it will be a tourist or a work visa.

Also, I am a native French but also have an American citizenship. I have been living in the states for 12 years and have "0" French accent when speaking American. Smile

Question #1: I only have a 2 year degree but I am thinking of getting a TESOL/TESL/TEFL certificate. Would this be enough to teach English in Korea? (Daegu Area)

Question #2: What visa is required to teach English?

Question #3: Is there a high demand for English teachers in Daegu? I would hate to spend $1,000+ for the certification if there was no need for teachers.

Thank you in advance,
-Edwige
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ICAL_Pete



Joined: 25 Sep 2006
Posts: 119

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are already in Korea, there's a good chance you can get work even though officially the qualifications you will need are a degree and a TEFL certificate. By the way, it's well worth getting the latter not just for the sake of having the right qualifications, but also so that you will know the best approach in the classroom once you have a job.

Once there, simply get a list of local schools and contact them directly with your resume and sooner or later you should be able to pick something up. Would you classify yourself as bilingual? That would help also!
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unionjack
Site Admin


Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 507
Location: UK

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:23 am    Post subject: GUIDE TO TEACHING ENGLISH IN KOREA Reply with quote

Hello Edwige

Welcome to the Forum.

There is AN UNOFFICIAL GUIDE COMPILED BY AMERICAN CITIZEN SERVICES, U.S. EMBASSY, SEOUL regarding the teaching of English in Korea, which may be of use to you. Click on the following link:

http://travel.state.gov/travel/living/teaching/teaching_1240.html

We have nine ESL schools for Daegu listed in our ESL School Finder guide here:

http://www.esl-school-finder.com/

UJ
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Shakespearean



Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi edamron, I believe the answer to one of your questions is this:

As long as you have TOEFL certification, you're already allowed to teach in Korea provided you meet their education's standard for teaching as well as English speaking. They have a pretty laid-out policy when it comes to foreigners who want to teach in the country. Another thing, Korea has basically one of the most expensive English schools in the world too, that's why most Koreans would fly out of the country to just learn English.

Jane Phillis
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canadianbacon



Joined: 23 Nov 2009
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:32 am    Post subject: Teaching English without a certificate Reply with quote

Edamron
With or without a certificate, you should improve your English before you think about teaching it. When speaking hypothetically, we use the subjunctive case, not the simple past. "If there WERE no need...." Question 3
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sarah1davidson



Joined: 11 Aug 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

canadianbacon - I'd like to point out that it is acceptable to use "if there WAS .... " in informal English. I wouldn't expect people to use formal English when speaking on a forum. Sarah
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canadianbacon



Joined: 23 Nov 2009
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 3:20 am    Post subject: check your dictionary Reply with quote

By definition, written language is formal. Therefore, I am reasonable to correct the OP. Personally, I think it's also reasonable to expect that language teachers demonstrate the knowledge and skills they claim to be able to teach, whether they post on an internet forum or on a laundromat notice board.
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sarah1davidson



Joined: 11 Aug 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

canadianbacon, I think you'll find that written English can be both formal and informal. I don't really want to get into a big debate about this but you seem to be making assumptions about a person you've never even met.
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canuckophile



Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:58 am    Post subject: French also a possibility Reply with quote

You might check out jobs teaching French also - especially if you are near Seoul. Every once in a while they are looking for teachers of other languages, especially at universities. You might be able to work at your husband's uni. It would likely be just 'conversational' French so they may overlook the lack of a uni diploma (as long as it is noncredit class - I suspect to have a credit class you would have to have the diploma)

I am actually surprised that some are saying you don't need a diploma to teach English in Korea. I have never heard of this, but good luck. For an E2 teaching visa, you have to produce your uni diploma, so I don't see how it could be an 'official' job.
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zylan



Joined: 14 May 2014
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 1:34 am    Post subject: AMERICAN TEACHER Reply with quote

I wonder if it is easier for an American teacher to get a job in Korea teaching English vs. an American who isn't a teacher. In other words, I know of some American teachers who wouldn't mind teaching English in Korea for a few years.
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